Enel Nuclear Building Permit Violated Law, Slovak Court Says

Monday, August 26, 2013

Slovakia’s nuclear watchdog violated the law when it issued a building permit for Enel SpA’s 3.7 billion-euro ($5 billion) nuclear project because Greenpeace wasn’t allowed to comment, the Supreme Court ruled.

The Italian utility’s local unit, Slovenske Elektrarne AS, in 2009 began building two new reactors at the Mochovce nuclear power plant after receiving a permit by the Office for Nuclear Supervision. The high court asked the regulator to repeat the proceeding and include Greenpeace, according to the June 27 ruling posted on the office’s website today.

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Greenpeace Targets Swedish Nuclear Plants

Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Two nuclear-power plants majority-owned by Vattenfall AB, a state-owned Swedish power company, were targeted by Greenpeace activists, about 70 of whom broke into restricted areas.

The activists targeted the Ringhals plant on Sweden's west coast and the Forsmark facility on the east coast. Combined they produce about 36% of energy consumed in Sweden.

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Germany may set up nuclear waste fund

Friday, April 13, 2012

The German government ill consider setting up a publicly administered fund to manage the disposal of nuclear waste from its power plants, environment minister Norbert Röttgen said following the publication of a Greenpeace report on Wednesday.

Greenpeace has called for a public fund because it fears German nuclear operators Eon, RWE, EnBW and Vattenfall may go bankrupt or try to wriggle out of their obligations after 2022, when the last of Germany’s reactors are due to close.

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Research plan for nuclear waste issued

Monday, February 6, 2012

An EU consortium on the geological disposal of radioactive waste has issued a research plan to deliver scientific and technological information on the construction of permanent underground sites. A consultation on the plan runs until next week.

The IGD-TP group wants Europe to have built its first disposal facilities by 2025. It aims to provide common advice on the safe disposal of highly radioactive waste. France, Finland and Sweden have the most advanced projects.

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UK nuclear industry windfall feared

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

The nuclear industry could receive a £3.4bn windfall as a result of plans to set a carbon floor price, according to green campaigners.

WWF and Greenpeace argue the coalition’s move to make low-carbon technologies more profitable by setting a minimum carbon price would provide a big boost to the nuclear sector. They argue the move breaches its promise not to provide subsidies for new nuclear power.

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The great atomic bluff

Sunday, April 18, 2010

Constant hold-ups, skyrocketing costs, faulty construction…Finland’s new Olkiluoto reactor, touted as the great white hope for Europe’s nuclear sector, is looking more and more like a great white elephant – and casting a fat black shadow over the whole industry.

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Designs for new UK nuclear reactors are unsafe, claims watchdog

Monday, November 30, 2009

Major setback for energy plans as report finds flaws in US and French models

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Greenpeace boards reactor equipment ship

Wednesday, November 18, 2009

COPENHAGEN — Six Greenpeace activists Monday boarded a ship carrying French-made steam turbines bound for a new nuclear power station in Finland, the environmental group said.

The protestors climbed on board the Happy Ranger as it made its way through the Fehmarn Belt strait between Denmark and Germany and unfurled banners including one which read "Nuclear madness, made in France".

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German Company Sent Nuclear Material for Open-Air Storage in Siberia

Monday, November 9, 2009

The Western media reported last week on how the German company Urenco shipped nuclear material to Siberia, where the highly toxic waste was stored in containers in the open air. The company has stopped deliveries and will store the material with higher standards in Germany in the future.

The radiation warning sign was so small that few passers-by took note in the commuter rail station in Kapitolovo, Russia. Fifty-six steel canisters were sitting there on a summer day three years ago. Just a stone's throw away, people were waiting for trains to take them to downtown St. Petersburg.

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Families face nuclear tax on power bills

Monday, October 19, 2009

Industry promised subsidy if market price fails to encourage new plants

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