Sizewell

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Centrica writes off £200m to quit nuclear power project

Monday, December 3, 2012

British Gas owner Centrica is expected to write off £200m when it pulls out of the country's nuclear new build programme in the new year.

Centrica has the option of taking a 20 per cent stake in building nuclear power stations at Hinkley Point in Somerset and Sizewell in Suffolk alongside French group EDF.

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Government to rip up rulebook and subsidise new nuclear plants

Monday, October 22, 2012

The Government is planning to write a "blank cheque" to the nuclear industry by underwriting the cost of new power stations, leading energy academics have claimed in a letter to The Independent.

Under a major policy U-turn being considered by ministers, the taxpayer would be left to cover the cost of budget over-runs or building delays at new nuclear plants. Costly setbacks are almost inevitable with such complex construction projects.

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British Energy says August nuclear output up 3% on month

Thursday, September 2, 2010

British Energy said Wednesday that output from its 15 nuclear reactors reached 3.5 TWh in August, up 3% from July, following the restart of the UK generator's Dungeness B-21 reactor on August 19.

The 550 MW Dungeness B-21 unit in Kent generated power for the first time in a year in August, following an extended outage to repair a pipe adjacent to a boiler reheater.

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Blaze inside nuclear power station takes firemen seven hours to bring under control

Tuesday, July 6, 2010

A fire inside a nuclear power station took firefighters seven hours to extinguish yesterday.

Emergency plans were put into effect as more than 45 firemen tackled the blaze at the Sizewell B station near Leiston, Suffolk.

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Sizewell nuclear disaster averted by dirty laundry, says official report

Thursday, June 11, 2009

A nuclear leak, which could have caused a major disaster, was only averted by a chance decision to wash some dirty clothes, according to a newly obtained official report.

On the morning of Sunday 7 January 2007, one of the contractors working on decommissioning the Sizewell A nuclear power station on the Suffolk coast was in the laundry room when he noticed cooling water leaking on to the floor from the pond that holds the reactor's highly radioactive spent nuclear fuel.

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Sizewell "cancer risk" fears

Wednesday, December 10, 2008

A COMMUNITY watchdog group is calling for more information about a German study which suggests that there are clusters of childhood leukaemia cases near nuclear power station sites.

The Sizewell Stakeholder Group - set up to improve liaison between the nuclear site, the local community and regulators - wants to know if there is any UK implication.

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No prosecution over contamination leak

Wednesday, December 10, 2008

ENVIRONMENT Agency bosses have decided not to prosecute the operator of Sizewell A over an incident which saw thousands of gallons of water contaminated when radioactivity escaped into the North Sea.

The incident, in January 2007, involved the fracture of a plastic pipe in a cooling pond building where highly radioactive spent fuel rods are stored under water prior to their despatch to the Sellafield reprocessing works in Cumbria.

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British Energy Sizewell B2 nuclear plant off line

Wednesday, November 12, 2008

LONDON, Nov 10 (Reuters) - The B2 turbine at British Energy's Sizewell nuclear power plant was offline on Monday morning, a website operated by the National Grid showed.

The unit in southeast England has capacity of 594 MW.

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Police given £10k for Sizewell protests

Thursday, November 6, 2008

POLICE officers who are called to protests outside Suffolk's nuclear power station will receive specialised training and equipment courtesy of those who own the reactor.

British Energy has given £10,000 to the county's police force to help them remove campaigners from the site at Sizewell.

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Britain's family uranium is safe in French hands

Monday, September 29, 2008

Vincent de Rivaz, the chief executive of France's EDF Energy, which is now in control of the UK's nuclear energy programme, doesn't laugh when I ask if he has succeeded where Napoleon failed.

"It's not a war," he says, very seriously. "This is an amicable agreement between two companies which will bring good news to everyone involved. Will it bring stability to customers for electricity bills? Yes. Will it bring new jobs? Yes. Will it improve climate change? Yes."

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