Climate sceptics?


Climate change is an often heard argument for the once called nuclear "renaissance". However, if one looks closer, there was something fishy about the industry using climate change protection as its most prominent feature... » Read more

More then thirty years of debate, and the controversy remains as polarised as ever. This website (to be fair - whose maintainer is anti-nuclear) collects news about nuclear power in Europe, sorted by nuclear power plant, type of power plant, country etc.

By presenting different (media) angles on current nuclear issues, we hope to be able to cut out some spin, either pro or against, and to allow the reader to make up his or her own mind about today's pro's and con's of nuclear power.

In the menu on the right you can select your country, the nuclear power plant in your neighbourhood, or your favourite company and read latest (most English) news about it.

Latest nuclear news

Plans for decommissioning EU nuclear power plants under way

Sunday, May 30, 2004

The European Commission's forward programme on decommissioning and waste management (D&WM) covers all the decommissioning of all existing installations (operating or otherwise) and the treatment of waste that exists or results from the decommissioning process. The programme is set to be reviewed every four years, primarily so as to take account of any new plants that may be built in the future. The aim is to decommission all existing plants up to "level 3" as soon as possible. This means removing any nuclear materials, any waste and radioactive equipment and any trace of residual radioactive waste in the buildings. The Commission is also investigating the green field option, where the structures are demolished and the land is returned to its original state.

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Slovene radio: Buying Croatia's share in Krsko cheaper than imported electricity.

Thursday, December 18, 2003

(From BBC Monitoring International Reports)

[Announcer] If Slovenia had bought Croatia's stake in the Krsko nuclear power plant in time, today we would not have problems with electricity. What's more, we could even export it and thereby make a nice profit. But instead, we might have to solve a future energy crisis, which actually only just began announcing itself, by building an additional nuclear power block in Krsko. Irena Majce reporting.

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Georgia nuclear hunt draws a blank

Monday, July 1, 2002

Two Soviet-era nuclear generators which sparked a huge international hunt in Georgia may not exist, authorities admitted on Monday.

The Strontium 90 generators were believed to be hangovers from the Soviet military presence in Georgia.

Dozens of experts took part in a two-week search of 550 square kilometres (200 square miles) of land in the west of the country, some of it so remote that they had to travel on foot or on horseback.

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Nuclear power plant closes

Thursday, March 28, 2002

Inside Bradwell power station in Essex

A ceremony has been held to mark the closure of one of Britain's oldest nuclear power stations after 40 years in service.

Bradwell power station on the Essex coast is to stop producing electricity over the Easter weekend, ready for a lengthy decommissioning process.

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Power station may cause leukemia

Monday, April 30, 2001

Children living across the river from Oldbury Power Station may be far more likely to die of leukemia.

A leading expert claims new evidence gathered around the power station in South Gloucestershire could undermine the whole nuclear industry.

The study says that children living across the River Severn in Chepstow are 11 times more likely to die of leukemia than the national average.

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Baby teeth clues to 'nuclear cancer'

Thursday, April 5, 2001

US scientists want British parents to keep their children's baby teeth to help them test a link between nuclear power and cancer.

They claim that children who live near nuclear power stations could be at a greater risk of cancer, and that the teeth will reveal how much radioactivity they have received.

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Czechs yield to neighbours on Temelin EIA

Wednesday, December 13, 2000

The Czech Republic has agreed that its Temelin nuclear power plant will undergo a full environmental impact assessment (EIA) in line with EU requirements before fully coming on stream. Pressure for the change was exerted by the European Commission after vigorous allegations by neighbours Austria and Germany that the plant did not match western standards. The first of the power station's two 981 megawatt reactors has been running at test levels since 10 October.

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Turkey drops Akkuyu project, citing IMF economic program

Tuesday, July 18, 2000

Prime Minister Bulent Ecevit announced immediately following a cabinet meeting on July 25 that Turkey will not proceed with a long delayed power reactor project at Akkuyu Bay and may reconsider the nuclear power option only at some unspecified later time after Turkey has mastered serious economic difficulties.

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Bulgaria agrees to shut nuclear reactors

Tuesday, November 30, 1999

The Bulgarian government has agreed to close four of the six nuclear reactors at its Kozloduy plant by 2006 at the latest, the European Commission said today. The accord means all eight reactors classed as dangerous and "unupgradeable" that are located in countries due to join the EU will be decommissioned within a decade.

The EU has repeatedly stressed that the closure of the four Kozloduy reactors by 2002 would be a condition of Bulgaria's eventual entry into the bloc. But the Bulgarian government recently passed a law which would have seen the last reactor decommissioned only in 2010.

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Neutral Sweden Quietly Keeps Nuclear Option Open

Thursday, November 24, 1994

In the Stockholm suburb of Agesta, a small rock hillock rises amid pine forests and horse farms. It might be just another playground for Scandinavian climbers but for one startling feature: Protruding from the top of the mound, like a missile peeking from a silo, is the conical tip of a nuclear reactor cooling tower.

Thirty years ago, this 65-megawatt reactor buried 50 yards deep and capable of sizable plutonium production was a key component of a vigorous Swedish program to develop a nuclear bomb option, a project that at its Cold War height secretly employed 350 scientists and technicians at the Defense Ministry.

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