Climate sceptics?


Climate change is an often heard argument for the once called nuclear "renaissance". However, if one looks closer, there was something fishy about the industry using climate change protection as its most prominent feature... » Read more

More then thirty years of debate, and the controversy remains as polarised as ever. This website (to be fair - whose maintainer is anti-nuclear) collects news about nuclear power in Europe, sorted by nuclear power plant, type of power plant, country etc.

By presenting different (media) angles on current nuclear issues, we hope to be able to cut out some spin, either pro or against, and to allow the reader to make up his or her own mind about today's pro's and con's of nuclear power.

In the menu on the right you can select your country, the nuclear power plant in your neighbourhood, or your favourite company and read latest (most English) news about it.

Latest nuclear news

Power station may cause leukemia

Monday, April 30, 2001

Children living across the river from Oldbury Power Station may be far more likely to die of leukemia.

A leading expert claims new evidence gathered around the power station in South Gloucestershire could undermine the whole nuclear industry.

The study says that children living across the River Severn in Chepstow are 11 times more likely to die of leukemia than the national average.

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Baby teeth clues to 'nuclear cancer'

Thursday, April 5, 2001

US scientists want British parents to keep their children's baby teeth to help them test a link between nuclear power and cancer.

They claim that children who live near nuclear power stations could be at a greater risk of cancer, and that the teeth will reveal how much radioactivity they have received.

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Czechs yield to neighbours on Temelin EIA

Wednesday, December 13, 2000

The Czech Republic has agreed that its Temelin nuclear power plant will undergo a full environmental impact assessment (EIA) in line with EU requirements before fully coming on stream. Pressure for the change was exerted by the European Commission after vigorous allegations by neighbours Austria and Germany that the plant did not match western standards. The first of the power station's two 981 megawatt reactors has been running at test levels since 10 October.

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Turkey drops Akkuyu project, citing IMF economic program

Tuesday, July 18, 2000

Prime Minister Bulent Ecevit announced immediately following a cabinet meeting on July 25 that Turkey will not proceed with a long delayed power reactor project at Akkuyu Bay and may reconsider the nuclear power option only at some unspecified later time after Turkey has mastered serious economic difficulties.

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Bulgaria agrees to shut nuclear reactors

Tuesday, November 30, 1999

The Bulgarian government has agreed to close four of the six nuclear reactors at its Kozloduy plant by 2006 at the latest, the European Commission said today. The accord means all eight reactors classed as dangerous and "unupgradeable" that are located in countries due to join the EU will be decommissioned within a decade.

The EU has repeatedly stressed that the closure of the four Kozloduy reactors by 2002 would be a condition of Bulgaria's eventual entry into the bloc. But the Bulgarian government recently passed a law which would have seen the last reactor decommissioned only in 2010.

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Neutral Sweden Quietly Keeps Nuclear Option Open

Thursday, November 24, 1994

In the Stockholm suburb of Agesta, a small rock hillock rises amid pine forests and horse farms. It might be just another playground for Scandinavian climbers but for one startling feature: Protruding from the top of the mound, like a missile peeking from a silo, is the conical tip of a nuclear reactor cooling tower.

Thirty years ago, this 65-megawatt reactor buried 50 yards deep and capable of sizable plutonium production was a key component of a vigorous Swedish program to develop a nuclear bomb option, a project that at its Cold War height secretly employed 350 scientists and technicians at the Defense Ministry.

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How safe if SAFE?

Saturday, August 27, 1994

A plan to upgrade two nuclear reactors in Solvakia may force Western governments to stop dithering over nuclear safety in Eastern Europe.

Ever since the reactor at Chernobyl exploded in 1986 spewing radioactivity over more than 20 countries, Europeans have lived in fear of another large-scale nuclear disaster. That fear grew when the Iron Curtain fell, revealing the full extent of the problems with nuclear plants in the former Eastern bloc. It also fuelled a fierce debate: should Soviet-designed reactors be shut down or could they be made 'safe'?

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Lucens reactor site may return to public use

Wednesday, August 9, 1989

Swiss voters in the region of the dismantled Lucens reactor have passed a proposal to return the site to civilian use. Lucens, Switzerland's first nuclear plant, was permanently shut down only one month after it began operation, after a partial fuel meltdown in 1969. The unit was an 8.5-MWe gas-cooled heavy-water reactor.

Residents of the canton (state) of Vaud approved a proposal for the final phase of decommissioning, ending the legal obligations to monitor the site.

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